Extra Credit Opportunity – Plagiarism Essay

Write an multi-paragraph essay of at least 500 words on this topic: Define plagiarism (cite examples), discuss why it is wrong and what the consequences are, and explain how to avoid it.

You will need to use quotes from at least four (4) sources in your essay. I am providing two:

CLICK HERE to access the plagiarism policy from Hillsborough Community College. When you cite this source, refer to it as “Brandon Campus” – there will be no page numbers.

CLICK HERE to access a document called “Is It Plagiarism?” from Purdue University. When you cite this source, refer to it as “Purdue University” – there will be no page numbers.

You do not need to provide a Works Cited page (since I have not yet taught you how to do this), but do so if you know how. (Always strive to impress your instructor.) Nonetheless, I should easily be able to find your sources based on your citation method.

Your essay should be formatted according to the MLA guidelines that we repeatedly discussed in class and which are available on the Essay Writing Help tab above. Points will be deducted for papers that are not formatted correctly.

Any essay that has plagiarized information will receive no points at all.

This assignment is worth up to 50 extra credit points.

I said I would post this yesterday but was unable to do so. You never suffer for my deficiencies, so this essay will be due Tuesday at the start of your class time (instead of Monday, which I originally announced in class). No late papers will be accepted, even for absences – work is due when it is due.

Have fun writing your essay – I hope you learn something new that will be helpful to you in your future.

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Some Topics for Poems

Use these as we write a poem every day in April to celebrate National Poetry Month. Or write about whatever is on your mind and important to you. Feel free to reuse topics on different days – sometimes an idea just seems to open up as it sits in your head. It doesn’t matter what you write – just write!

  1. Write a poem in which you INTRODUCE YOURSELF
  2. Write a THANK YOU poem
  3. Write about the BEST DAY EVER (or the worst)
  4. Write about a FIRST KISS (or a last kiss)
  5. Write a poem to SOMEONE YOU MISS
  6. Write a HATE poem
  7. Write a poem to a CELEBRITY
  8. Write about something you FEAR
  9. Write a poem about your GOALS
  10. Write a poem about a SPECIAL PLACE
  11. Write a poem about something you WORRY about
  12. Write a poem about a TREASURE
  13. Write a poem that is really a DIALOGUE
  14. Write a poem giving ADVICE TO A 10-YEAR OLD
  15. Write a poem in PRAISE OF YOUR SCHOOL
  16. Write a poem about BEING ALONE
  17. Write a poem to you FROM YOUR PET
  18. Write a poem comparing your LIFE to a GAME
  19. Write a poem to your FUTURE SELF expressing your hopes
  20. Write a poem about DIFFERENCES
  21. Write a poem of PRAYER
  22. Write a poem about something you BELIEVE
  23. Write a poem about the WEATHER
  24. Write a poem about WRITING A POEM
  25. Write about your FAVORITE PASTIME
  26. Write a poem about your PERSONAL MOTTO
  27. Write a poem that TEACHES A LESSON
  28. Write a poem about REFUSING something
  29. Write a poem about a CHILDHOOD MEMORY
  30. Write a GOOD-BYE poem

Poetry Presentation

April is National Poetry Month. To celebrate this, we will study, write, and share poetry together all month long.

The first part of this month-long celebration will be you, bringing in a poem that resonates with you that you want to share with others. You can find many poems on the Internet, of course, but consider all your sources. Any poem is fine, so long as it does not contain profanity.

On your assigned day, you will

  • bring in the poem, printed out or typed. Be sure to identify the title and author.
  • present a one hundred word (minimum) paragraph explaining why this poem resonates with you. This will be delivered to me, not read aloud to the class.
  • stand in front of the class and read your poem aloud. (Practice reading it out loud before presenting to the class, please)

For this, you will receive 25 points. Not presenting on your day will earn you a zero, unfortunately, so make sure you are prepared.

NOTE: For clarity, you will read your poem aloud in front of the class (and your reading should sound as if you have practiced reading it out loud) and then deliver to me the physical copy of your poem as well as your 100-word paragraph.

Extra Credit Opportunity

Just because I love you (and because I want you to help yourself), here is an extra credit opportunity worth up to 75 points. This is due Monday (3/18) at the start of your class time – no late papers, no excuses.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ASSIGNMENT

It’d be swell of you to contact friends and let them know; not everyone has added me to their REMIND services. They’ve been invited, of course, but I cannot do more than I can do.

Novel Studies

Beginning Monday, February 4, we will begin an in-depth study of a novel (see titles below). It is to your benefit to own a copy of this book, so directions have been provided below to allow you to acquire one digitally for your personal use.

English III (Periods 1, 2, 4, 5): The Red Badge of Courage, by Stephen Crane

If you have a Kindle, or the Kindle app (which is free), you can purchase a copy of the novel for $0.60. CLICK HERE FOR A LINK TO THE BOOK.  Doing so means you can complete your Reader’s Response log digitally (rather than having to handwrite). You can also highlight in the ebook as well as use the dictionary function to look up the definitions of words you do not know. I cannot recommend this avenue highly enough! CLICK HERE FOR DIRECTIONS TO GET THE FREE KINDLE APP.

If you do not have access to Kindle, you can acquire the book for free from Hoopla if you have a Polk County library card. CLICK HERE FOR A LINK TO THE BOOK Hoopla will not allow you to highlight or take notes digitally, but it will at least allow you to have the book available to read on your own as well as to study from. CLICK HERE FOR DIRECTIONS TO GET THE FREE HOOPLA APP.

The book is also available for free on the Internet. CLICK HERE FOR A LINK TO THE BOOK. Project Gutenberg has books that are in the public domain, but you will not be able to highlight, take notes, or bookmark your place as you read. At least you will have the book available to read on your own as well as to study from.

Apparently, you can listen to the audiobook of this novel for free on YouTube, but this will not help you complete your readers response log. Still, the more you do to increase your knowledge/understanding about the book, the better off you’ll be.

I *do* have physical copies of the book to be used in class, but these cannot be taken home.

English III Honors (Period 3): Cat’s Cradle, by Kurt Vonnegut

If you have a Kindle, or the Kindle app (which is free), you can purchase a copy of the novel for $6.99. CLICK HERE FOR A LINK TO THE BOOK.  Doing so means you can complete your Reader’s Response log digitally (rather than having to handwrite). You can also highlight in the ebook as well as use the dictionary function to look up the definitions of words you do not know. I cannot recommend this avenue highly enough! CLICK HERE FOR DIRECTIONS TO GET THE FREE KINDLE APP

If you do not have access to Kindle, you can acquire the book for free from Hoopla if you have a Polk County library card. CLICK HERE FOR A LINK TO THE BOOK Hoopla will not allow you to highlight or take notes digitally, but it will at least allow you to have the book available to read on your own as well as to study from. CLICK HERE FOR DIRECTIONS TO GET THE FREE HOOPLA APP.

I do not have physical copies of the book to share; be sure to acquire a copy. (NOTE: You *can* apparently listen to the audiobook for free on YouTube, but this may make your readers response more difficult to complete. It is better than nothing, I suppose.)

 

English IV (Period 7): Wuthering Heights, by Emily Bronte

If you have a Kindle, or the Kindle app (which is free), you can purchase a copy of the novel for $0.99. CLICK HERE FOR A LINK TO THE BOOK.  Doing so means you can complete your Reader’s Response log digitally (rather than having to handwrite). You can also highlight in the ebook as well as use the dictionary function to look up the definitions of words you do not know. I cannot recommend this avenue highly enough! CLICK HERE FOR DIRECTIONS TO GET THE FREE KINDLE APP

If you do not have access to Kindle, you can acquire the book for free from Hoopla if you have a Polk County library card. CLICK HERE FOR A LINK TO THE BOOK Hoopla will not allow you to highlight or take notes digitally, but it will at least allow you to have the book available to read on your own as well as to study from. CLICK HERE FOR DIRECTIONS TO GET THE FREE HOOPLA APP.

The book is also available for free on the Internet. CLICK HERE FOR A LINK TO THE BOOK. Project Gutenberg has books that are in the public domain, but you will not be able to highlight, take notes, or bookmark your place as you read. At least you will have the book available to read on your own as well as to study from.

Apparently, you can listen to the audiobook of this novel for free on YouTube, but this will not help you complete your readers response log. Still, the more you do to increase your knowledge/understanding about the book, the better off you’ll be.

I *do* have physical copies of the book to be used in class, but these cannot be taken home.

Weekend Warriors – English 3 and English 3H Only

This is an optional assignment for the weekend. If you choose to do it and do it to my expectations, you will earn 50 out of 50 points. If you choose not to do it, you will get an X in the gradebook, which means you are exempt from the assignment (it will neither hurt nor help you).

Read one of the following stories by Edgar Allan Poe and create a Reader’s Response Log of at least ten (10) entries to track your reading:

  • The Black Cat
  • Hop-Frog
  • Never Bet the Devil Your Head
  • The Murders in the Rue Morgue
  • The Purloined Letter

Here is the document I shared with you this week about Readers Response Logs: CLICK HERE

Here is a website that has those stories by Poe: CLICK HERE

If you choose to do this assignment – which is intended to boost your grade – it is due Monday at the beginning of class.

Feel free to leave a comment below if you have any questions.

Pink Papers

Did you get a pink paper today? That was my sincere attempt to help you, by alerting your parents to your situation since you did not make the decision to self-advocate.

Be sure to have them sign it and return it to me tomorrow. Otherwise I have to go to even more work to encourage your parents to help you succeed. This may be telephone calls, text messages, emails – all of which takes my own personal time. And if I have to take my personal time to motivate you to success, then I feel it is only fair that you have to do extra work for me.

I reserve the right to also alert Guidance to your decision to fail English by refusing to write the essays I assign and give you an entire week for. I have been known to alert students’ other teachers and even their club sponsors and coaches when a student is making the wrong choices.

Why do I do this? To help you. You can pretend all you wish, but writing is an invaluable skill and many of you – MOST of you – need to improve your skills if you hope to be competitive in the world of business and/or college.

So get those letters signed and returned to me tomorrow. If you do so, I will give you 10 points on one of those essays you did not turn in – as a gift. If you do not, I will … make a decision that will in no way benefit you but that I have already cleared with the school’s administration.

And be sure to get to work on next week’s essay. There is absolutely no reason for you to fail this class.

Essay – Overcoming Adversity

The topic for this week’s essay comes from The Princeton Review: Popular College Application Essay Topics (and How to Answer Them):

“The lessons we take from obstacles we encounter can be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failureHow did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience?”

This is a narrative essay, which means you are going to tell a story: the story of a time you overcame a challenge, suffered a setback, or experienced failure. This comes straight from your own experiences, so search your memories for an experience that taught you something (about yourself, about other people, about the world in general). This needs to be something important, of course, something that others can feel sympathy for and can commiserate with you about. But your story is YOUR story, and the only way to invest your reader is to write in such a way that your story invites the reader to be on your side as you deal with this situation that you faced.

This does not have to be about school, by the way. Any experience that you have had is fair game for this essay. My only caution is to CONSIDER YOUR AUDIENCE. This is not an essay you’re writing to your friends, so stay away from topics that you would not want to share with someone you respect. I am your first audience, but the real audience is an anonymous group of adults who will decide whether or not you are worthy of admissions into their college.

That’s right: This essay you are writing this week is one that you might possibly use to apply for admission to a college you hope to attend. Keep that audience in mind as you consider your situation and write your essay. You want to impress these people with your writing ability as well as your ability to think deeply and reflect meaningfully about a personal experience you have had.

To be honest, I cannot do much more brainstorming for you than this. My own shortcomings and failures are nowhere near the same as yours. What I *can* and *will* do for you is this: If you write me a brief note and tell me what you are thinking about writing, I will give you some feedback about your idea and help you flesh it out a bit. Similarly, I will make myself available to you before and after school this Thursday and Friday so you can talk to me about your idea. Yes, I will do the extra work for *you* so that *you* can be more successful. Remember to thank me and show me proper respect; all that I do, I do for you.

The essay is due Tuesday, January 29, at the beginning of your class time. As you are well aware by this time, I will not accept late work. You have an entire week to think about, write, and revise your essay; there is literally NO REASON you cannot submit your work on time.

The minimum length is 500 words, but feel free to exceed this as you get into your narrative. Your life is important. Your experiences are important. Your reflection on these life lessons is important. I would not be surprised to receive essays that go beyond even 1,000 words. Make it your mission to impress your readership.

(This was 568 words, by the way, and it took me about a half-hour to type with my crippled hands. You are certainly capable of writing 500 words in a week.)

 

MLA PowerPoint and Common Errors Document

These are the files we discussed in class today. I expect the essays you submit on Tuesday to adhere to the guidelines we established. I am in the pursuit of excellence, as you should be.

MLA Format – Click Here

Common Errors Document – Click Here

Please feel free to contact me, either by leaving a comment below, sending me a message using Remind, or sending me an email. I would love to have the opportunity to help you write the best essay ever 🙂

Oh, and for the record, your absence from my class does not excuse your paper being improperly formatted. Contact a friend or email me if you have questions about anything on these documents. Those of you who were in class today: Be a buddy and call someone you know was absent to let them know about the content of today’s class.

Have a great weekend, Best Friends!